How weather affects fish behavior

Hey everybody and thanks for stopping by again, today we will be covering weather and how it affects activity below the water’s surface. There are many things about weather that influence fish ranging from approaching weather fronts, pressure systems, and temperature but the most important factor is by  far the atmospheric pressure.

Weather fronts & systems

Fish are extremely sensitive to changes in atmospheric pressure, whether it’s caused by approaching fronts or pressure systems. The pressure variations just before a cold front or approaching system triggers fish to become more active and feed closer to the surface. Some of my best fishing action inland and in saltwater have been during some pretty nasty weather that we probably shouldn’t have been in. Trust me from experience when I say when you’re in a storm so bad your fishing rods are signing to you from static, its time to go. Once the system has passed through it can be like somebody flipped a switch instantly and all the fish have lockjaw. Once the pressure starts to rise it can be very hard to coax a fish to bite without finessing a lure directly in front or getting a reaction strike out of natural instinct, because most active feeding has stopped.

Rain

Fishing during a light to moderate rain is one of the experiences I love most about fishing, it can trigger feeding frenzies no matter what type of water you are fishing. Bass and panfish know rain brings things falling from the sky and topwater bites can be some of the best you will ever have in your life during a good rain. while fishing the flats for redfish and trout when the rain started you knew it was time to throw on Alameda Rattle Cork and start drifting over potholes or the rocks in Baffin Bay in south Texas, and there is nothing more exciting than seeing your red and green rattle cork disappear in between waves. Just remember to be careful, tropical squalls and summertime thunderstorms can pop up out of thin air on a bluebird day and put yourself in an unforgiving situation. Use sound judgment and when in doubt get the heck out.

The high pressure following the weather systems

When the pressure starts to rise and settle into the area you will get the dreaded “bluebird” days, where fishing is slow and hunting is slower. The fish will sulk and settle around bottom features, structure, and the schools become more scattered and clumpy than usual. Targeting fish in high pressure almost always consists of three things, finess fishing lures, fast moving baits to cause reaction strikes, or live bait. The fish become so lethargic that it becomes very hard to locate the concentrations. When you do find a fish on a fast-moving bait in high pressure you will become much more productive if once you catch a fish on fast movers, switch to a jig or soft plastic and work that area hard, the results will speak for themselves.

In conclusion there are many more weather features to discuss when it comes to fishing but they will be covered on upcoming posts much closer to when they happen such as how to fish the dog days of summer, fishing the spawning cycles of bass and crappie and so on. Thanks for reading and we hope to see you back for some more posts! Have a safe weekend!

The weather this week has kept me from any kind of fishing.

Ice Storm this week.
Ice Storm this week.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s